Global Flash prices

Dropping flash drive prices will be major drivers for smartphone and tablet sales according to China electronics wholesale company iSourceChina.

The retail price for flash memory has tumbled in the last 10 years with a 128 MB drive costing $33 in 2003 compared to $36.99 for 16GB drive in 2010.

According to Johnathan Walker, PR Manager for China wholesale company iSourceChina, this can do nothing but provide more ammunition for Android smartphone and tablet makers already making deep inroads into the iPhone’s market share.

Sony released four new Android smartphone models at the 2012 CES with LG and Motorola also launching phones at the show.

This comes following news from ad network Chitika that Android had overtaken iOS in the US as the dominant smartphone operating system.

“First-time smartphone buyers are now more likely to get an Android, especially with the cost of memory being less than $30 for 16GB,” said Mr Walker.

Android, which relies on external mini SD cards for much of its memory has previously been hampered with the high cost of mini SD cards and the unavailability of high capacity mini SD cards up to December 2007.

“The wholesale cost for 16GB of flash memory in that form is now $25 or less, that makes it entirely possible for people to own an Android phone that outperforms the iPhone in every way for a fraction of the cost.”

iSourceChina has just launched its own line of flash cards, USB flash drives and novelty USB flash drives, something Mr Walker says customers have been asking about for a long time.

“Smartphones and tablets are more than tablets, they are mobile command centers and people need serious memory capacity to get the most out of them.”

iSourceChina has been happy to accommodate, according to Mr Walker and has been able to source USB drives and SD cards for prices that added up to $1.02 USD per GB.

“Memory is getting to the point to where it’s more affordable than the phone calls now.”

Johnathan Walker is the PR manager for iSourceChina, the most affordable source for high quality USB drives online.

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